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Full text of "University of North Carolina Department of Pharmacy"

UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA. 



DEPARTMENT 



OF 



F^HARM 




CHAPEL HILL, N. C: 
IS8VKD FROM THE UXIVEISSITY PRE 

1897. 



AKK OUK CEMEX T. 



The establishment of a Department of Pharmacy at 
the University of North Carolina marks an era in the 
progress of the pharmaceutical profession in this state. 
The first session of this school will begin September 
10, 1897, when candidates will present themselves for 
registration. The advantages here offered will meet 
the requirements of the large number of students who 
are annually compelled to obtain their pharmaceutical 
education in other states. Briefly stated the advantages 
are as follows: 

1. Thorough, careful individual instruction. 

2. The practical experience derived from the active 
work in the laboratories and drugstore. 

■ 3. Intimate association with the other departments 
of the University, to all of which the student of Phar- 
macy has free access, and the daily contact witli stu- 
dents pursuing various branches of learning. 

4. The use of the large library and reading room 
and the well equipped gymnasium. 



FACULTY. 

EDWIN ANDERSON ALDERMAN, D.C.L.. President. 

EDWARD VERNON HOWELL, A.B., Ph.G., Professor of Phar- 
macy. 

FRANCIS PRESTON VENABLE, Ph.D., Professor of Chemistry : 

JOSHUA WALKER GORE, C.E., Professor of Physics. 

HENRY VanPETERS WILSON, Ph.D., Professor of Biology. 

CHARLES BASKERVILLE, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Chem- 
istry. 

CHARLES STAPLES MANGUM, M.D.. Professor of Materia 
Medica. 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION. 

Theory and Practice of Pharmacy. First year. Five hours a 
week. 

PROFESSOR HOWELL. 

This course will consist of lectures upon the following' 
subjects, with practical demonstration and the employ- 
ment of proper apparatus whenever necessary. 

Metrology: comminution, heat, evaporation, distilla- 
tion, sublimation. 

Fusion: calcination, granulation, oxidation, reduction, 
etc. 

Solution: of solids, liquids and gases, deliquescence, 
efflorescence, etc. 

Colation: filtration, decolorization, clarification, pre- 
cipitation, etc. 

Maceration: expression, infusion, decoction, etc. 

Percolation: — and the preparation and study of the 
following: waters, syrups, honeys, glycerites, mucilag- 
es, mixtures, spirits, elixirs, liniments, collodions, tinc- 
tures, wines, vinegars and lluid extracts, 



Theory and Practice of Pharmacy. Second year. Five hours 
a week. 

PKOFESSOE HOWELL. 

The Senior course will take up in detail the official 
forms and preparations of drugs. Beginning with the 
inorg-anic compounds, the salts will be considered with 
regard to their commercial qualities and pharmaceutical 
uses and preparations. 

The organic compounds will be taken up commencing 
with the salts of the organic acids and passing to the 
natural and artificial organic compounds. 

The writing and criticising of prescriptions and the 
study of their incompatibilities will be taken up thor- 
oughly. 

Practical Course in Operative Pharmacy. ■ First year. Two 
hours, two afternoons a week. 

PKOFESSOK HOWELL 

This course will closely follow the lectures and will in 
some degree supplement them. Typical examples of the 
various official preparations will be made. A short lec- 
ture pointing out the difficulties in the work and the 
method of overcoming - them will precede the operations. 
Instruction will be g-iven in the preparation of tinctures, 
syrups, pills, ointments, suppositories, lozenges, granu- 
lar and crystallized salts, scaled iron salts, etc. 

Thorough ami practical instruction in active work 
will be g-iven in a drug" store in the town. 

Practical Course in Operative Pharmacy. Second year. Two 
hours two afternoons a week. 

PKOFESSOK HOWELL. 

During this course the more complicated operations 
will be carried out. The making and testing of various 
official preparations and also the assay of some of the 
most important drugs will be undertaken. 



Lectures on Pharmaceutical Botany. Three hours a week, 
one term. 

PKOFESSOK HOWELL. 

This course is preparatory to the study of Materia 
Medica, and takes up the study of the flower, the vari- 
ous topics of fruits, seeds, etc., and a careful study of 
the descriptive terms as applied to leaves, stems and 
roots. 

Lectures on Materia Medica. Three hours a week, one term. 
PROFESSOR 5IANGUM. 

This course consists of lectures on the geographical 
and hotanical sources of drugs, descriptions and uses of 
the same, together with their physiological and toxic 
effects. 

Opportunity will be given the student to familiarize 
himself with many of the crude drugs and their prepa- 
rations. 

Elementary Physics. Two hours a week. 
PROFESSOR GORE. 

This course extends throughout the entire year, being 
made as practical as possible and is abundantly illustrat- 
ed with experiments. The lectures embrace the simple 
problems of matter and energy, with special reference to 
the phenomena of heat, light and electricity. 

Experimental Chemistry. Three hours a week. 
PROFESSOR VENABLE. 

The elements are taken up in order and described, and 
this study is followed by the laws of their chemical com- 
bination and the compounds formed. The latter part 
of the course is taken up with organic chemistry. 



Analytical Chemistry, Toxicology and Urinalysis. Two hours 

PROFESSOR VENABLE AND ASSISTANT PROFESSOR BASKER- 

YILLE. 

Qualitative analysis. The student is made to per- 
form all the usual tests for the ordinary elements and 
compounds, so as to become familiar with them and be 
able to analyze qualitatively the ordinary substances 
met with. 

Toxicology and Urinalysis. The nature and action 
of the common poisons are studied and practice is given 
in the tests for them. The latter part of the course con- 
sists of qualitative and, in part, quantitative analysis of 
the urine, followed by the microscopic examination of 
urinary sediments. 

Elements of Physiology. Three hours a week, one term. 
PROFESSOR WILSON. 

Lectures, laboratory work, and demonstrations. A 
brief but practical study is made of the skeleton, joints, 
muscles, heart, blood-vessels, brain, eye, ear, and vis- 
cera. Demonstrations of bloodflow in the capillaries, 
phenomena of reflex action, microscopic structure of the 
chief tissues. 

General Biology. Three hours a week. (Fall term). 
PROFESSOR WILSON. 

Representative types of the great groups of animals 
and pi ants are dissected and studied microscopically. The 
forms range on the one side from the unicellular animals 
to the vertebrates, and on the other from the unicellular 
plants to the flowering plants. The structure of the 
cell and the nucleus, and the changes of the latter dur- 
ing division are included in this course. In the lectures 
the forms to be studied are briefly described, their rela- 
tions to other living- things are pointed out, and the 



principles which they illustrate are explained. The 
fundamental facts concerning- living; things are thus 
learned directly from nature in such a way as to develop 
the power of accurate observation, skill in handling in- 
struments, and method in the recording of notes. 

Botany. Laboratory and field work with recitations. Three 
hours a week. (Springf term). 

PROFESSOR WILSON. 

Representatives of the various orders of flowering 
plants are collected in the field, and are studied in the 
laboratory. Identification with Gray's Manual. The 
knowledge of structural and physiological botany gained 
in the General Biology course, is here supplemented on 
the systematic side. 

ARRANGEMENT OF COURSES. 

These courses are arranged over two years and lead 
up to the degree of Graduate in Pharmacy, (Ph.G.). 

During the first year the instruction will include The- 
ory and Practice of Pharmacy, Practical Course in Ope- 
rative Pharmacy, Elementary Physics, Experimental 
Chemistn', Elements of Physiology. 

During the second year, Theory and Practice of Phar- 
macy, Practical Course in Operative Pharmacy, Lec- 
tures in Pharmaceutical Botany, Analytical Chemistry, 
Toxicology and Urinalysis, General Biology, Materia 
Medica. 

EXAMINATIONS. 

1 All students matriculating in the School of Pharmacy 
will be required to pass an examination in the usual ru- 
dimentary branches of English education. 

Final examinations will be held at the end of each 
term on the subjects embraced in the course. 



LABORATORIES. 

A description of the Chemical, Physical and Biologi- 
cal Laboratories will be found in the general catalogue. 
They are especially well equipped. 

The Pharmaceutical Laboratory is placed at the ser- 
vice of the students in Pharmacy. This is fitted up 
with desks, tables, water, gas and electric lights, and 
such apparatus and material as are necessary for the 
prosecution of their work. 

Recognizing the effectiveness of laboratory methods 
no pains will be spared to make this thorough and prac- 
tical. 

QUIZZES. 

Quizzes upon the different branches will be regularly 
held. Specimen quizzes upon Materia Medica, Chemis- 
try and Pharmacy will be held once a week and will con- 
sist in the recognition and correct writing of the official 
name of the specimens presented. 

EXPENSES. 

The fee for tuition in this department is seventy-five 
dollars, one half payable at the beginning of each term 
in September and January. A student in this depart- 
ment has no other fees to pay unless he occupies a Uni- 
versity room. Board costs from $8.00 to S13.00 per 
month. 

TEXT BOOKS. 

Remington's Theory and Practice of Pharmacy. 

Maisch's Organic Materia Medica. 

U. S. Pharmacopaeia. 

Bastin's College Botany. 

Gage's Elements of Physics. 

Venable and Howe — Syllabus of Inorganic Chemistry. 

Remsen — Organic Chemistry. 

Venable — Qualitative Analysis. 

Reese — Toxicology.